Lowcountry Digital Library
Digitizing and making accessible unique and historic items from institutions across the coastal region of South Carolina
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“83 Broad Street, Federal Courthouse and Post Office, ca. 1896. View of South (Rear) elevation. 4” x 5” B/W photo.”
Photograph from the Charles N. Bayless Photos of Charleston and Georgetown County, S.C. held by The Charleston Archive at CCPL.
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William Lindsay Koob III.
"William Lindsay Koob III (b. 1946) is a Citadel graduate (1968) who served fourteen years in US Army Intelligence, rising to the rank of Major. In 1987, while stationed at the Pentagon, he admitted under interrogation to being a homosexual and was forced to resign his commission rather than risk a messy investigation and a less-than-honorable discharge (this happened in the days before "Don’t ask, don’t tell.") A short time later, he came out to his parents and brother (also a Citadel grad) during a visit back home: “I told the whole story, and by the time I finished, I was in tears. My brother made a few supportive comments — then, everyone sat and waited for a response from my father: the retired Army Colonel. There I was: the third generation of my family to serve in the military. But, my Dad just kind of sat there, looking down at the table. After awhile, he got up from the table, walked around to my seat … and he pulled me to my feet, hugged me warmly, and said, ‘Son, I don’t like it, I don’t understand it, and I’m going to have to think about this for a long time … but you’re my son and I love you.’ Could I have asked for anything more? No.” Koob further reported that his Citadel classmates, following the leadership of their former cadet company commander, have been accepting of his homosexuality: “I am still one of the brotherhood," he said. "And, for that, I will be eternally grateful.” (Koob, Interview by Kerry Taylor 26 February and 24 April 2010). These days, Lindsay (known as "Bill" during his Citadel years) maintains his thriving "retirement career" as probably the only internationally-respected classical music critic and journalist to ever graduate from The Citadel." 
Photograph from The Citadel Photograph Collection held by the Citadel Archives & Museum.
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On January 15, 1559, Elizabeth Tudor was crowned Queen Elizabeth I at Westminster Abbey, London. She became one of England’s greatest monarchs by her death in 1603.
Westminster Abbey, London, England.
"Photograph shows a well-dressed man in top hat posed outside. Title and "350 (3002)" on label."
Photograph from the Keystone View Company Lantern Slides, 1892-1912 held by the College of Charleston Libraries.
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Sanitation and Inspection - Misc.
"B&W Photograph. Man pumping well pump. On back, stamped, "S. C. State Board of Health Photograph by E. S. Powell""
Photograph from the Charleston County Health Department Photographs, MSS 958 held by the Waring Historical Library (MUSC).
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On November 22, 1900, the first Mercedes was taken for a test drive.
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Joe Engel with someone’s Mercedes, DP camp Zeilsheim, 1946.
"Photograph of Joe Engel posed next to a Mercedes in DP camp Zeilsheim, 1946."
Photograph from the Joe Engel Papers, 1938-2006 held by the College of Charleston Libraries.
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Medical College of the State of South Carolina, School of Medicine Class of 1899.
Photograph from the MUSC College of Medicine Class Photos collection held by the Waring Historical Library (MUSC).
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Joe Engel in soccer uniform, DP camp Zeilsheim, 1946.
"Individual photograph of Joe Engel in soccer uniform, DP camp Zeilsheim, 1946."
Photograph from the Joe Engel Papers, 1938-2006 held by the College of Charleston Libraries.
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On October 5, 1789, the royal family was forced from the palace of Versailles to live under surveillance at the Tuileries Palace in Paris. Several years later, on October 16, 1793, Marie-Antoinette, Queen of France, was beheaded by the guillotine.
Versailles, France.
"Aerial photographs of the palace at Versailles. According to the caption, one of the pilots returning from a reconnaissance mission had some leftover film and took these images of the palace."
Photographs from a page of the Lawrence Layden Scrapbook, 1941-1945 held by the College of Charleston Libraries.
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On September 4th, 1886, after 30 years of waging war against the encroaching U.S. government troops, Geronimo surrendered.
Sioux Indians in Full Feather. 
"Location not known. Title and "182 (16718)" on label."
Photograph from the Keystone View Company Lantern Slides, 1892-1912 held by the College of Charleston Libraries.
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On July 8, 1951 the capital city of France, Paris, celebrated its 2,000th birthday. The “City of Lights” was founded around 250 B.C. by a Gallic tribe known as the Parisii.
Photograph #1
Paris, France.
"Photographs of Paris including the Arc de Triomphe, the Siene River with the Eiffel Tower in the background and a close-up of Napoleon’s tomb. Layden was able to briefly visit Paris shortly after its liberation."
From the Lawrence Layden Scrapbook, 1941-1945 held by the College of Charleston Libraries.
Photograph #2
022_Eiffel Tower
"Eiffel Tower"
From the College of Charleston Scrapbooks and Photo Albums collection held by the College of Charleston Libraries.
On July 8, 1951 the capital city of France, Paris, celebrated its 2,000th birthday. The “City of Lights” was founded around 250 B.C. by a Gallic tribe known as the Parisii.
Photograph #1
Paris, France.
"Photographs of Paris including the Arc de Triomphe, the Siene River with the Eiffel Tower in the background and a close-up of Napoleon’s tomb. Layden was able to briefly visit Paris shortly after its liberation."
From the Lawrence Layden Scrapbook, 1941-1945 held by the College of Charleston Libraries.
Photograph #2
022_Eiffel Tower
"Eiffel Tower"
From the College of Charleston Scrapbooks and Photo Albums collection held by the College of Charleston Libraries.
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The first successful ascent of Mount McKinley was achieved on June 7, 1913.
View of Mountains #5
View of mountains, likely northwest South Carolina (Table Rock or vicinity).
From the Sabina E. Wells Photographs collection held by the Margaretta Childs Archives at the Historic Charleston Foundation.
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Black and white photo, 5” x 7”, featuring the Cooper River Bridge under construction. The caption reads “Progress - Cooper River Span, June 28, 1929 at 4:30 P.M. Suspended span ready to be freed from its cantilever condition and swung as a simple truss span, which was done on Sat., June 29, 1929, starting at 8 A.M. and being completed at 3: P.M.”
Photographic Record of the Cooper River Bridge
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Battery Park in the snow. One Meeting Street (George Robertson House) and 20 South Battery (Stevens-Lathers House) in background, 1898-1899. Part of the Sabina E. Wells Photographs Collection belonging to the larger Historic Charleston Foundation Monographs and Photographs Collection.
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Black and white photo of Rotterdam, Netherlands from 1929.  Caption: “Waterfront drive at Rotterdam.  A striking general view of the Dutch City.  The Haringoleet (canal) and a large portion of the city from the top of a ten story building.” (Photograph by Ewing Galloway).  Part of the Roy S. MacElwee’s Waterfront Design Study, 1929 collection.
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Black and white photo of a building on King Street, near Vanderhorst Street after the 1886 Charleston Earthquake.  It is part of the 1886 Charleston Earthquake Photographs collection.